Current project USS Centaur

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PopeTerry
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Current project USS Centaur

Post by PopeTerry » Sun Jul 29, 2018 8:50 pm

Hey everyone just thought I'd show a bit of my current project the 1/1400 StarCraft USS Centaur. This is my first resin kit and it seems to be going sort of well so far. The only main problem I've come across so far is that it seems that the weight of the nacelles are causing the pylons to bend. I've attempted to use hot water to warp them back into place but the pylons eventually bend again. If anyone has made a Centaur in the past I would love any advice you could give on how you tackled this problem.
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andyh
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Re: Current project USS Centaur

Post by andyh » Mon Jul 30, 2018 4:43 pm

The bad news is, there is no easy fix I know of.

The hard fix is, you will need a piece of brass ‘flat’ which you can bend into the correct curve and then grind out a channel along the bottom of the nacelle pylons, right through the centre torp housing, from one warp engine to the other. It’s a big job, but it’s also a permanent fix.

Andy
Last edited by andyh on Tue Jul 31, 2018 3:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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slawton
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Re: Current project USS Centaur

Post by slawton » Mon Jul 30, 2018 8:47 pm

Most modelers encounter this at 1 time or another. I'd depict it visually for the Centaur like this:
centaur_stand.jpg
centaur_stand.jpg (44.01 KiB) Viewed 432 times
Here you have the stand applying a force at approximately the center of mass of the model. However, gravity is acting on every part of the model, which will cause the sides, front and back to droop over time - how quickly depends on the strength/rigidity of the model material. This is more pronounced on larger models because the mass (volume) increases at a cubed rate to the size (an identical object at twice the length will be 8 times the mass). Given that deformation happens, one could simply counteract the effect by sharing equal time on an inverted stand:
inverted_stand.jpg
inverted_stand.jpg (40.64 KiB) Viewed 432 times
This may not be possible, so one may need to approximate an inverted stand by some sort of reverse compensation:
reverse_compensate.jpg
reverse_compensate.jpg (44.89 KiB) Viewed 432 times
A more ideal support would more equally support the various areas of the model (such as a carved/shaped foam container), as shown here:
ideal.jpg
ideal.jpg (58.53 KiB) Viewed 432 times
Such a support would be more suitable for storage than actual display, since the "stand" would now be as large/larger than the model, detracting from the appearance of the model. This would be a situation of mostly "storage" with relatively short durations of "display".

As Andy mentioned, the major "droopers" could be structurally enhanced with a more rigid material (such as brass). In this case, the pylons would not sag or sag less. However, they would likely twist and you'd start to notice the long engines droop and/or may no longer be a straight line (they too could also be structurally enhanced). The saucer front end may also start to curve downward.

I tend to work in a smaller scale (1/2500), where its generally less of a problem. Other more experienced modelers probably have their own solution/preferences. Once you've heard all the solutions, its really up to you to decide how you'd like to handle it.
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TrekMD
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Re: Current project USS Centaur

Post by TrekMD » Tue Jul 31, 2018 1:24 am

Nice! Looking forward to your finished model. :)
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Gidiot
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Re: Current project USS Centaur

Post by Gidiot » Tue Jul 31, 2018 4:19 am

Yes, Very nice start. I do not know if there is an easy fix to the drooping issue, you either over build the base or maybe a central base with three(ish) arched metal supports or put in (at risk of deforming the model in a different way) metal supports in the Nacelle struts. Perhaps you could design something like they use for the Eaglemoss collection that supports the nacelles and the main body using a clear resin? No matter what you do do, I'd love to see what you come up with!

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Dr_Corsa
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Re: Current project USS Centaur

Post by Dr_Corsa » Tue Jul 31, 2018 5:54 am

Hello!

It's always awesome to see new modeller here!

So to your Problem: I see 5 options for you:
1. You do nothing. I know...uncool.
2. You can try to build an Eaglemoss style base to hold the ship on pylons too. Don't know, how difficult this is.
3. You can glue a metal to under each pylon. That would looks little like the lover part of the primary hull with all that small parts there.
4. You maybe can check out, how big is the rollbar from 1/1000 scale Polar Lights USS Reliant and use this parts as pylons.
5. You can create your own pylons using Aluminium metal plate and modify this with tin layers for surface modifications of the pylons. I think that would be very very complicated.

My favorites are nr. 3 & 4...

Good luck,
Michael
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PopeTerry
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Re: Current project USS Centaur

Post by PopeTerry » Tue Jul 31, 2018 9:28 am

Loving your thoughts and ideas guys, you're all being incredibly helpful.

Luckily I work in an industrial estate so I've manage to find some bits of metal in the scrap metal bin that I could possibly use. While the idea of attaching metal plates to the pylons sounds like the best course of action, I would just hate to cause irreversible damage to the model. So I think at this moment in time I'll go the safe route and make a stand with multiple supports to hold everything in place. And maybe in the future when I'm more confident with resin kits or scale modelling in general, I'll revisit this kit and make a permanent fix.

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